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Sculptor for 23 years with a collection of 200 stone and 30 bronze pieces.

Represented by the Paul Mahder Gallery, San Francisco, CA.

Owner of Alexander Baughan Furniture for 23 years, serving as Creative Director & Furniture Designer.

Currently represented in 10 major markets nationwide.

Studied the classical figure in stone at the Harriet Moore Studio in San Francisco.

Studied the classical figure in clay at the Marilyn Rodriguez studio in San Francisco.

Studied stone carving at the Laguna Beach Art Institute in California.

Studied at Brigham Young University and University of Charleston.



Solo
2011 Paul Mahder Gallery, San Francisco, CA
2009 Paul Mahder Gallery, San Francisco, CA
2008 Grace Cathedral, San Francisco, CA
2005 Darnell Fine Art, Santa Fe, NM
2004 Darnell Fine Art, Santa Fe, NM
2002 Blue Room Gallery, San Francisco, CA
2001 Mussi Artworks Foundry, Berkeley, CA
2000 Peter Alexander Art & Furniture Gallery, San Francisco, CA
1999
  • Randall Whitehead Lighting Gallery, San Francisco, CA
  • Peter Alexander Art & Furniture Gallery, San Francisco, CA

Group
2011 Paul Mahder Gallery, San Francisco, CA
2005 Blue Room Gallery, San Francisco, CA
2004
  • Darnell Fine Art, Santa Fe, NM
  • Blue Room Gallery, San Francisco, CA
  • Bruggemann Contemporary, Santa Fe, NM
2002 Bruggemann Contemporary, Santa Fe, NM
2001
  • Belcher Gallery, San Francisco, CA
  • St. Gregory’s of Nyssa, San Francisco, CA
2000 Thomas Reynolds Gallery, San Francisco, CA
1999 SOMAR “Open Studio” 1201 – 8th Street, San Francisco, CA



Sasha Vasilyuk, “David Lee Baughan at Grace Cathedral,” San Francisco Examiner, July 2008
Rebecca Nestle, “Interview with David Lee Baughan,” Grace Cathedral, July 2008
Susan Hallsten McGarry, “Rebirth,” Pasatiempo, July 24, 2004



Sculpting is a process of consciousness and realization.

My sculpting process originates with an idea, an inner form in need of becoming conscious. It is a breaking of the surface, like a tool carving the stone releasing form into physical matter.

There are many aspects on which I rely. My schooling and training in all aspects apply but, on a much deeper level, I concentrate on the intuition of my heart and the sensibility of imagination.

My philosophy is that sculpture is forming within my inner world. Without sketches or models I begin to sculpt. Each stroke of the hammer on the stone brings me closer to the emerging form. As I move into the stone intuition acts as a guide to bring my work into consciousness. On another level, this creative process offers interactions of the unconscious with consciousness, healing the self and the collective while serving as a reminder of health and wholeness.

I am an admirer of Dr. Carl Jung. I have studied and deeply value his work. My sculptures integrate ideas and philosophies of the feminine.

This unique sculpting process has been deeply satisfying to my soul. My art is co-creation, imagination and liberation of inner form and psychology based upon the principles of sacred imagination.

William Blake said, “To the imagination, the sacred is self-evident.”

Natural Conversations are occurring all around us, each and every moment.

Some are light in nature while others are deep, provocative and transformative. The conversation around this body of work deals with a deep shedding of old ways, a peeling off of bark, skin. Dispositions, objects, ideas and beliefs that know longer serve the soul and the inevitable journey inward, are fragile paths at best. Culturally this deep breaking down or shedding allows a collective re-assessment of values as well patterns of behavior. Many, if not all, are going through this keyhole. The willingness to set upright and look deeply into impermanence allows the opportunity to experience this conversation of “old ways” that no longer serve the whole or self more spaciously. It's within this space of rawness and experience where heart and mind transform and open up to new dispositions and patterns of behavior where a deeper union of psyche and self begin to work in collaboration. Our suffering is our feeling of being separate and cut off. Letting go of old methodologies allows us to connect with others and more importantly understand the deep interdependence of all things.